Marlborough Association of Congregational Ministers

Collection History

The Marlborough Association of Congregational Ministers was formed and first met on June 5, 1725 in the house of Rev. Robert Breck, the second minister of the Marlborough First Parish Church. The formation of the association was the result of a vote of the Framingham Association the previous April. The association dealt with "cases of conscience, questions of difficulty in church discipline, or matters of disagreement, between the parties in a church, or between pastor and people." The original members of the Marlborough Association were John Swift, Robert Breck, John Prentice, Israel Losing, Job Cushing, John Gardner, and Ebenezer Parkman. The association met four times annually, with Marlborough as the designated meeting place, though in practice meetings took place in the homes of many of the member ministers. Due to declining membership, the ministers decided to dissolve the Marlborough Association on October 18, 1814.

For more information about the collection, view the archival finding aid for the Massachusetts Conference Collection records.

 

Digital Materials

Association records, 1725-1802

The association records record the history, work, and changes of the Marlborough Association beginning with its formation. Types of materials present in the volume include founding documents and signatories, lists of members present and absent from meetings, locations of meetings, meeting minutes and records of votes, and committee reports.

Association records, 1802-1842

The association records record the history, work, and changes of the Marlborough Association until its dissolution in 1814. Types of materials present in the volume include a copy of the founding records and signatories, lists of members present and absent from meetings, locations of meetings, meeting minutes and records of votes, committee reports, an index to volume 2, and a list of members in 1807. There is an 1842 note written by George E. Day, minister of the Union Church in Marlborough, indicating he was given charge over the Marlborough Association record books.

 

Related Materials

Marlborough, Mass. First Church.

 

Special Thanks

This digital resource has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor.

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this resource do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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