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Beacon Street Diary blog

May Meeting of CCHS

CCHS Meeting: May 24, 2007 at Hancock Church, Lexington, MA. Tours of historic properties at 2:30. Lecture to follow at 3:30. All are welcome. Registration for event is $10.00.

CCHS Lecture Title: The New England Singing School and the Transformation of Congregationalist Praise, 1720-1800.

Stephen A. Marini is Elizabeth Luce Moore Professor of Christian Studies and Professor of American Religion and Ethics at Wellesley College. A specialist in colonial and early American religious culture, he has also been a frequent visiting professor on New England theological faculties including Harvard Divinity School, Andover Newton Theological School, and most recently Yale Divinity School/Yale Institute of Sacred Music. He is the author of three books, including "Radical Sects of Revolutionary New England" (Harvard University Press, 1982) and "Sacred Song in America: Religion, Music, and Public Culture" (University of Illinois Press, 2003).

Professor Marini is also the founder and singing master of Norumbega Harmony, Boston’s leading advocate of New England singing-school music. He is General Editor of the group’s recent tunebook, "The Norumbega Harmony: Historic and Contemporary Hymns and Anthems from the new England Singing School Tradition" (University Press of Mississippi, 2003) and has conducted the 25-voice choral ensemble’s performances on three CDs, including Sweet Seraphic Fire: New England Singing School Music from the Norumbega Harmony (New World Records, 2005).

Professor Marini is currently working on two book projects, both of them germane to today’s lecture, provisionally titled "The Mantle of Praise: Word and Music in American Protestant Culture" and "American Reformation: Religion in Revolutionary Society, 1750-17".


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